Joseph Lam: Patterns of Sin in the Hebrew Bible

Joseph Lam: Patterns of Sin in the Hebrew Bible
 

LamJoseph Lam, Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, recently gave an interview with the New Books Network regarding his book, Patterns of Sin in the Hebrew Bible: Metaphor, Culture, and the Making of a Religious Concept (Oxford University Press, 2016). In the interview he addresses a wide range of topics, including his academic background, the relationship between language and culture, and the definition of metaphor. To listen to the interview, click here.

For more on the book, see the Oxford University Press website.

Posted in Faculty Publications on June 27, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

David Lambert: How Repentance Became Biblical

David Lambert: How Repentance Became Biblical
 

HowRepentanceBecameBiblicalProfessor David Lambert, who teaches in the area of Hebrew Bible and its history of interpretation, was recently interviewed for the OnScript podcast regarding his new book, How Repentance Became Biblical: Judaism, Christianity, and the Interpretation of Scripture (Oxford University Press, 2016). Professor Lambert talked about how his book made him as a scholar, how the book came to be, and the scholarly alternatives to the ‘colonizing mode of interpretation’. Click here to hear the podcast.

For more on the book, see the Oxford University Press website.

Posted in Faculty Publications on April 21, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Woman-Led Prayer: A Conversation with Juliane Hammer

Woman-Led Prayer: A Conversation with Juliane Hammer
 

Hammer InterviewProfessor Fareen Parvez and Mariam Awaisi conducted an interview with Juliane Hammer, Associate Professor and Kenan Rifai Scholar of Islamic Studies at UNC Chapel Hill. Professor Hammer specializes in the study of American Muslims, contemporary Muslim thought, women and gender in Islam, and Sufism. She reflects here on the topic of woman-led ritual prayers in Islam and the debate surrounding them. Click here to read the interview.
 

Posted in Faculty Publications on September 30, 2015. Bookmark the permalink.

Catholicism Today by Evyatar Marienberg

Catholicism Today by Evyatar Marienberg
 

MarienbergCatholicismFrom Routledge: “Catholics are not Christians. They worship Mary. They do whatever the pope says. They cannot divorce. They eat fish on Fridays. These flawed but common statements reflect a combined ignorance of and fascination with Catholicism and the Catholic Church. Catholicism Today: An Introduction to the Contemporary Catholic Church aims to familiarize its readers with contemporary Catholicism. The book is designed to address common misconceptions and frequently-asked questions regarding the Church, its teachings, and the lived experience of Catholics in modern societies worldwide. Opening with a concise historical overview of Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular, the text explores the core beliefs and rituals that define Catholicism in practice, the organization of the Church and the Catholic calendar, as well as the broad question of what it means to be Catholic in a variety of cultural contexts. The book ends with a discussion of the challenges facing the Church both now and in the coming decades. Also included are two short appendices on Eastern Catholicism and Catholicism in the United States.”

Posted in Faculty Publications on September 3, 2014. Bookmark the permalink.

Cambridge Companion to American Islam, Juliane Hammer & Omid Safi, Eds.

Cambridge Companion to American Islam, Juliane Hammer & Omid Safi, Eds.
 

HammerAmericanFrom Cambridge University Press: The Cambridge Companion to American Islam offers a scholarly overview of the state of research on American Muslims and American Islam. The book presents the reader with a comprehensive discussion of the debates, challenges, and opportunities that American Muslims have faced through centuries of American history. This volume also covers the creative ways in which American Muslims have responded to the myriad serious challenges that they have faced and continue to face in constructing a religious praxis and complex identities that are grounded in both a universal tradition and the particularities of their local contexts. The book introduces the reader to some of the many facets of the lives of American Muslims that can only be understood in their interactions with Islam’s entanglement in the American experiment.

Posted in Faculty Publications on July 3, 2014. Bookmark the permalink.

Mystical Science of the Soul by Jessica Boon

Mystical Science of the Soul by Jessica Boon
 

BoonSoulFrom University of Toronto Press: “The Mystical Science of the Soul explores the unexamined influence of medieval discourses of science and spirituality on recogimiento, the unique Spanish genre of recollection mysticism that served as the driving force behind the principal developments in Golden Age mysticism. Building on recent research in medieval optics, physiology, and memory in relation to the devotional practices of the late Middle Ages, Jessica A. Boon probes the implications of an ‘embodied soul’ for the intellectual history of Spanish mysticism. Boon proposes a fundamental rereading of the key recogimiento text Subida del Monte Sión (1535/1538), which melds the traditionally distinct spiritual techniques of moral self-examination, Passion meditation, and negative theology into one cognitively adept path towards mystical union. She is also the first English-language scholar to treat the author of this influential work – the Renaissance physician Bernardino de Laredo, a pivotal figure in the transition from medieval to early modern spirituality on the Iberian peninsula and a source for Teresa of Avila’s mystical language.”

Posted in Faculty Publications on June 27, 2014. Bookmark the permalink.

Bones of Contention by Barbara Ambros

Bones of Contention by Barbara Ambros
 

image_miniFrom the University of Hawaii Press: “This tightly written, thoroughly researched, and timely book sheds new light on important questions of contemporary Japanese life. It is ultimately about how Japanese people think and feel about pets and other kinds of animals and, in turn, what pets and their people tell us about life and death in Japan today. Ambros’ compelling exploration of the necrogeography and religious politics of pet mortuary rites will take the field in a new direction. It is the first work I know of to deal so fully with one of the most distinctly Japanese aspects of this issue: ritualized mourning for dead animals. Bones of Contention will be read by scholars of anthropology, history, and religious studies both inside and outside of Japanese studies as well as by those with an interest in animals, pets, and pet-keeping.” —Ian Miller, Harvard University

Posted in Faculty Publications on June 25, 2014. Bookmark the permalink.