2017 Department Awards Ceremony

2017 Department Awards Ceremony
 

Awards

On Wednesday, April 19, the department held its annual awards ceremony at which we celebrated the accomplishments of our students and faculty over the past year. The ceremony was held in the University Room at Hyde Hall and was followed by a wonderful time of conversation over refreshments. The many recognitions we noted that day include:

Undergraduate Student Awards:

Phi Beta Kappa inductee: Morgan Ferone

Honors Theses:

  • Averyl Edwards, “Beyond a Cisgender Genesis: Reading the Creation Narratives Through a Transgender Feminist Lens”
  • Amrithaa Gunabalan, “An Unknowable Ideal: Objectivism as a New Religious Movement and the Subsequent Institutionalization of Ayn Rand’s Ideas in American Politics”

Bernard Boyd Memorial Prize: Averyl Edwards

Graduate Student Awards:

Peck Prize for Graduate Student Teaching: Joanna Smith

Religious Studies Department Summer Research Awards: Patrick D’Silva, Brad Erickson, Shannon Schorey, Joanna Smith, and Tim Smith

GSOC Peer Recognition Teaching Award: Micah Hughes

Styers-welcome

Welcome from Prof. Randall Styers

Boyd-Prize

Prof. Todd Ochoa with Averyl Edwards, winner of the Boyd Prize

books

Prof. Lauren Leve presents a summer research award to Patrick D’Silva

ABD

Joanna Smith and Isaiah Ellis presenting the coveted “ABD” mugs

books

Books published by our faculty over the past year

Posted in Faculty News, Graduate Student News, News & Events, Undergraduate Accomplishments on April 26, 2017. Bookmark the permalink.

Recent Faculty Awards: Carl Ernst and Todd Ochoa

Recent Faculty Awards: Carl Ernst and Todd Ochoa
 

Two members of our faculty have recently received support and recognition for their scholarship with major awards:

ErnstCarl Ernst, William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Professor in Religious Studies, is one of the inaugural recipients of the Global Humanities Translation Prize from the Global Humanities Initiative, a program of the Buffett Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University. Professor Ernst’s project will involve producing an annotated translation of the classical Arabic poems of the Persian mystic Mansur al-Hallaj, and the finished work will be published by Northwestern University Press in 2018. For the official award announcement, see here.
 
 

OchoaTodd Ochoa, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, has won a National Humanities Center fellowship for the 2017-18 academic year, representing one of only 35 fellows chosen out of 630 applications. Professor Ochoa will be working on a research project titled “Conjecture for a Bembé: Religious Recombination in the Black Atlantic,” and the fellowship provides the opportunity for interaction with the other resident fellows over the course of the academic year through seminars, lectures, and conferences. The announcement and full list of 2017-18 fellows can be found here.
 

Congratulations, Carl and Todd!

Posted in Faculty News on April 4, 2017. Bookmark the permalink.

The 9 Biggest Archaeology Findings of 2016: Noah’s Ark Mosaic

The 9 Biggest Archaeology Findings of 2016: Noah’s Ark Mosaic
 

Donkeys in Noah's Ark

The Noah’s Ark mosaic from the site of Huqoq, discovered this past summer by Prof. Jodi Magness and her team, was just selected by Live Science as one of “The 9 Biggest Archaeology Findings of 2016!”

To view the list, click here.

For more on the Huqoq excavations, including how to participate in the 2017 season, click here.

Posted in Faculty News on December 30, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Online Symposium on David Lambert’s How Repentance Became Biblical

Online Symposium on David Lambert’s How Repentance Became Biblical
 

LambertSyndicate Network, an online forum for facilitating conversations on topics in the humanities, is currently hosting an online symposium on Prof. David Lambert’s award-winning book, How Repentance Became Biblical: Judaism, Christianity, and the Interpretation of Scripture (Oxford University Press, 2016).

The symposium consists of critical reviews of the book by four scholars of different theoretical perspectives, with subsequent responses by Prof. Lambert leading to further back-and-forth dialogue. This format allows for an in-depth, illuminating exploration of the many issues that the book raises.

The online symposium can be found here. Currently the site has posted the responses of Joel Kaminsky (Smith College) and Susanne Scholz (Southern Methodist University); the responses of Reed Carlson (Harvard Divinity School) and Jeffrey Stackert (University of Chicago) are still to come.

Posted in Faculty News, Faculty Publications on November 30, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Carl Ernst: Podcast Interview on Islamophobia

Carl Ernst: Podcast Interview on Islamophobia
 

Ultimate ConcernsProfessor Carl Ernst recently conducted an interview with the Ultimate Concerns podcast on the topic of “American Islamophobia,” in which he addressed the many dimensions of this problem, from the possible causes of Islamophobia to the ways in which one might respond. The discussion relates to the topic of his edited book, Islamophobia in America: The Anatomy of Intolerance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

For the podcast interview, click here.

“Ultimate Concerns” is a podcast on religion and culture hosted by Ron Mourad, Professor of Religious Studies at Albion College and a graduate (B.A. 1994) of our department. For more information click here.

Posted in Faculty News on November 25, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Study Abroad: 2017 Huqoq Excavations with Jodi Magness

Study Abroad: 2017 Huqoq Excavations with Jodi Magness
 

UNC students

Since 2011, Prof. Jodi Magness has led archaeological excavations at the site of Huqoq in Israel’s Galilee, where she and her team have garnered international attention for their discovery of an ancient synagogue building with stunning mosaic floors. She is returning to Huqoq in summer 2017 and invites students to participate in the excavation through UNC’s Study Abroad program.

This coming season, the excavations will take place May 29-June 30, 2017. The deadline to apply for the program is February 9, 2017 (the online application system opens on December 1, 2016). The field school program offers students 6 hours of academic credit.

For more information, see the flyer for the field school program, the description on the UNC Study Abroad website, or the Huqoq Excavation Project website. You might also be interested in the previous coverage of her work on our website here (9/14/2016), here (7/6/2016), and here (7/15/2014).

In addition, Prof. Magness recently did an interview with UNC’s podcast series, “Well Said,” in which she described the goals and methods of archaeology as well as the specific implications of her work at Huqoq:

Posted in Faculty News on October 25, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Joseph Lam on MeaningOfLife.tv

Joseph Lam on MeaningOfLife.tv
 

Professor Joseph Lam recently did an interview with Benjamin Perry on MeaningOfLife.tv regarding his book, Patterns of Sin in the Hebrew Bible: Metaphor, Culture, and the Making of a Religious Concept (Oxford University Press, 2016). They discussed a variety of topics, including the “life” and “death” of metaphors, ancient vs. modern notions of sin, and the role of metaphor in contemporary religious and public discourse. Watch the video below:

To view the video on the MeaningOfLife.tv site, click here.

Posted in Faculty News, Faculty Publications on October 18, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Todd Ochoa on IAH Podcast

Todd Ochoa on IAH Podcast
 

Todd Ochoa, Associate Professor in Religious Studies, was recently featured in an episode of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities podcast. In this 11-minute interview, Prof. Ochoa discusses his course on “Introduction to Religion and Culture,” his ongoing research in Cuba, and his love of the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien. Listen to the podcast below:

Posted in Faculty News on October 9, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

McLester Colloquium with David Lambert

McLester Colloquium with David Lambert
 

On Wednesday, September 21st, our faculty and graduate students gathered in Hyde Hall for the first McLester colloquium of the academic year. The speaker was our own David Lambert, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, who gave a lecture titled “Toward a History of Tendentiousness: Biblical Studies and the ‘Penitential Lens.’” Drawing from his award-winning book, How Repentance Became Biblical: Judaism, Christianity, and the Interpretation of Scripture (Oxford University Press, 2016), Professor Lambert argued that attending to the reading strategies we adopt toward ancient texts such as the Hebrew Bible can reveal much about our modern notions of the “self.” As is typical of McLester colloquia, the lecture was followed by a wide-ranging critical discussion as well as plenty of time for informal conversation over refreshments.

Lambert

Prof. David Lambert

Lambert

Question from the audience

Looking forward to the next McLester colloquium!

Posted in Events, Faculty News, Graduate Student News on September 26, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey

Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey
 

Sufi JourneyThis year, the Carolina Center for Performing Arts has put together a series of events titled Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey. Organized in collaboration with Carl Ernst, Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, the program seeks to highlight the richness and diversity of the Muslim experience through a combination of performances, workshops, and other community events. From the program website:

“This project evolved from a desire to refute monolithic thinking about the practice of Islam and about Muslim communities and individuals – in other words, to contest the notion that there is any single narrative of Muslim identity or experience, a notion which is reinforced by oversimplified presentations of Muslims in our national discourse.

“We propose that the performances and community events we have curated will reveal the plurality of Muslim identity. Specifically, we explore Sufism as a spiritual and cultural lens into Islam through the work of performers from four Muslim-majority nations outside of the Arab world: Indonesia, Iran, Pakistan and Senegal. This project is not exhaustive, but rather illustrative. These performances are but a glimpse into the vast richness of Muslim cultures and artistic expressions, yet we do believe that experiencing even just two examples of that diversity can invalidate monolithic thinking.”

For more information, including a detailed listing of this year’s events, see the program website.

Posted in Events, Faculty News on September 22, 2016. Bookmark the permalink.