Isaac Weiner and Amy DeRogatis awarded Luce Foundation Grant for American Religious Sounds Project

Isaac Weiner and Amy DeRogatis awarded Luce Foundation Grant for American Religious Sounds Project
 

Amy DeRogatis (PhD UNC 1998), Professor of Religious Studies at Michigan State University, and Isaac Weiner (PhD UNC 2009), Associate Professor of Comparative Studies and Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Religion at The Ohio State University, have been awarded a three year, $750,000 grant issued by The Henry Luce Foundation’s Theology Program for the American Religious Sounds Project.

The ARSP is a multiyear, collaborative initiative co-directored by Weiner and DeRogatis. The project aims to study religious diversity by documenting and interpreting the auditory cultures of the various religions in the United States. The project has grown since its first developments aided by a 2015 grant awarded by Humanities Without Walls. This new grant will allow geographic expansion, long-term preservation and accessibility, interpretive scholarship, and community engagement.

Congratulations, Amy and Isaac!

Posted in Alumni News, News & Events on October 1, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Sacred Writes, Directed by Megan Goodwin, receives Henry Luce Foundation Grant

Sacred Writes, Directed by Megan Goodwin, receives Henry Luce Foundation Grant
 
Image may contain: text Megan Goodwin (PhD UNC 2014), Visiting Lecturer of Philosophy and Religion at Northeastern University, has been named Director of Sacred Writes at Northeastern University, a project committed to amplifying the voices of experts who often go unheard in public discourse.

Sacred Writes is a four-year project funded by the LUCE foundation’s Theology Program, geared toward the advancement of public scholarship on religion and theology. Sacred Writes is one of seven programs to receive 2018 grants through the Theology Program.

Congratulations, Megan!

 

Posted in Alumni News, News & Events on August 24, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

New Book by Calvin Lane (UNC 2002)

New Book by Calvin Lane (UNC 2002)
 

Calvin Lane (UNC 2002) has published Spirituality and Reform: Christianity in the West, ca1000-1800 (Lexington / Fortress).

From the Lexington/ Fortress Press Website:

“In colorful detail, Calvin Lane explores the dynamic intersection between reform movements and everyday Christian practice from ca. 1000 to ca. 1800. Lowering the artificial boundaries between “the Middle Ages,” “the Reformation,” and “the Enlightenment,” Lane brings to life a series of reform programs each of which developed new sensibilities about what it meant to live the Christian life. Along this tour, Lane discusses music, art, pilgrimage, relics, architecture, heresy, martyrdom, patterns of personal prayer, changes in marriage and family life, connections between church bodies and governing authorities, and certainly worship. The thread that he finds running from the Benedictine revival in the eleventh century to the pietistic movements of the eighteenth is a passionate desire to return to a primitive era of Christianity, a time of imagined apostolic authenticity, even purity. In accessible language, he introduces readers to Cistercians and Calvinists, Franciscans and Jesuits, Lutherans and Jansenists, Moravians and Methodists to name but a few of the many reform movements studied in this book. Although Lane highlights their diversity, he argues that each movement rooted its characteristic practice – their spirituality – in an imaginative recovery of the apostolic life.”

Dr. Lane is currently an adjunct professor in history at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio as well as an affiliate professor at an Episcopal seminary in Wisconsin, Nashotah House.

Congratulations, Calvin!

Posted in Alumni News on August 12, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

New Book by Gregory A. Lipton (PhD 2013)

New Book by Gregory A. Lipton (PhD 2013)
 

Gregory A. Lipton, a PhD graduate of our department, has recently published a book titled Rethinking Ibn ‘Arabi (Oxford University Press, 2018), which offers a critique of the interpretive field of Frithjof Schuon, or Schuonian Perennialism, and challenges long-held preconceptions of both Ibn ‘Arabi and Perennialism. From the Oxford University Press website:

“The thirteenth century mystic Ibn `Arabi was the foremost Sufi theorist of the premodern era. For more than a century, Western scholars and esotericists have heralded his universalism, arguing that he saw all contemporaneous religions as equally valid. In Rethinking Ibn `Arabi, Gregory Lipton calls this image into question and throws into relief how Ibn `Arabi’s discourse is inseparably intertwined with the absolutist vision of his own religious milieu–that is, the triumphant claim that Islam fulfilled, superseded, and therefore abrogated all previous revealed religions.

Lipton juxtaposes Ibn `Arabi’s absolutist conception with the later reception of his ideas, exploring how they have been read, appropriated, and universalized within the reigning interpretive field of Perennial Philosophy in the study of Sufism. The contours that surface through this comparative analysis trace the discursive practices that inform Ibn `Arabi’s Western reception back to the eighteenth and nineteenth century study of ‘authentic’ religion, where European ethno-racial superiority was wielded against the Semitic Other-both Jewish and Muslim. Lipton argues that supersessionist models of exclusivism are buried under contemporary Western constructions of religious authenticity in ways that ironically mirror Ibn `Arabi’s medieval absolutism.”

Dr. Lipton will be joining the faculty of High Point University in the fall.

Congratulations, Gregory!

 

Posted in Alumni News on May 27, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Kathryn Lofton Keynote Address

Kathryn Lofton Keynote Address
 

On Saturday, May 12, Dr. Kathryn Lofton, (PhD UNC 2005), Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University, delivered the keynote address at UNC’s Doctoral Hooding Ceremony. Dr. Lofton is a historian of religion who has written extensively about capitalism, celebrity, sexuality, and the concept of the secular. In her work, she has examined the ways the history of religion is constituted by the history of popular culture and the emergence of corporations in modernity. You can watch Dr. Lofton’s Keynote Address below:

 

Posted in Alumni News, News & Events on May 21, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Benjamin White receives NEH stipend

Benjamin White receives NEH stipend
 

Benjamin White, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Clemson University, has been awarded a Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).  He received the stipend to support his project “The Authorship of the Pauline Epistles: The Promise and Limitations of Computational Methods.”

He was one of 65 scholars around the country selected to receive 2018 grants through the NEH Summer Stipends program, out of a field of nearly 800 applicants.

Dr. White received his Ph.D. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from UNC in 2011.

Congratulations, Benjamin!

 

Posted in Alumni News on May 2, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Carrie Duncan wins Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence

Carrie Duncan wins Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence
 

Carrie Duncan, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Missouri College of Arts and Science, was awarded a 2018 Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence. Dr. Duncan received her PhD in Religious Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2012.

The MU announcement explains that Dr. Duncan aims to help students “better understand why they believe the things they do.” As a professor in the Department of Religious Studies, Duncan has taught thought-provoking courses on topics such as the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and literature and history of Ancient Egypt. She hopes students gain from her classes a realization that beliefs and attitudes are influenced by history and culture. Duncan accomplishes this goal through readings, evidence-based debates, mock trials and small group discussions.

Congratulations, Carrie!

 

Posted in Alumni News on April 10, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Jill DeTemple is Recipient of 2018 Excellence in Teaching Award

Jill DeTemple is Recipient of 2018 Excellence in Teaching Award
 

The Committee on Teaching and Learning of the American Academy of Religion has announced that Jill DeTemple is the recipient of the 2018 Excellence in Teaching Award. The AAR Award for Excellence in Teaching recognizes the importance of teaching and honors outstanding teaching in the field.

Dr. DeTemple received her PhD in Religious Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005. She is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University. Her research interests include faith-based economic development, Latin American religions, Pentecostalism, and the use of dialogue in classrooms to promote intellectual humility, conviction, civic engagement, and learning. She is the author of Cement, Earthworms and Cheese Factories: Religion and Community Development in Rural Ecuador, published in 2012 by the University of Notre Dame Press, and is a co-principal investigator on an ongoing research project funded by the University of Connecticut and the Templeton Foundation, “The Dialogic Classroom: A Pedagogy for Engaging Difference with Intellectual Humility.”

Congratulations, Jill!

Posted in Alumni News, News & Events on March 29, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Update from Sam Kessler (PhD 2016)

Update from Sam Kessler (PhD 2016)
 

Kessler

Samuel Kessler, who received his PhD from our department in 2016, currently serves as Postdoctoral Fellow in Judaic Studies in the Department of Religion and Culture at Virginia Tech. Sam recently shared with us the wonderful news that he will assume the post of Assistant Professor of Religion and (inaugural) Bonnier Family Chair in Jewish Studies at Gustavus Adolphus College starting in Fall 2018!

For more on Sam’s academic work and interests, see his profile on the Virginia Tech website or on his personal website.

Congratulations, Sam!

Posted in Alumni News on March 12, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.

Joseph Terrell of MIPSO: UNC RELI Major ’13

Joseph Terrell of MIPSO: UNC RELI Major ’13
 

In a new interview, Joseph Terrell of Chapel Hill band Mipso discusses the influence of UNC’s Religious Studies classes on his music. On his experience as a UNC Religious Studies major, he says, “It completely formed who I am, and it was an excellent education to be a songwriter.” Watch the interview with Terrell by UNC doctoral student Becca Henriksen here:

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular” (Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes.

Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn.

Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run.

Posted in Alumni News on March 7, 2018. Bookmark the permalink.